Innovation to Market A 2021 Winter (UCSD)

MGT121A: Innovation to Market (A)

As of January 4th, 2021

 

Undergraduate Course: Winter Quarter 2021

Instructor: Kanetaka M. Maki, Ph.D. (Visiting Associate Professor)
E-mail: kanetaka@kanetaka-maki.org
Office Location: Online
Office Hours: By appointment

Teaching Assistant: Meenakshi Balakrishna
E-mail: mkbalakr@ucsd.edu
Office Hours: By appointment

Class Time: Mondays 6:30-9:20 PM (Makeup: Jan 20th and Feb 16th)
Final Exam: Wednesday, Mar 17th, 7:00-9:59pm
Classroom: Zoom

Note: This syllabus may be updated and revised at a later date.

DESCRIPTION

Innovation to Market A is the first course of a two-course sequence that provides the competencies needed to identify and transform both technical and non-technical innovations into viable ventures that capture profitable market opportunities. The course will provide students with an introduction to the strategic and operational issues of developing an innovation into a competitive and sustainable business.

This is a team-based project course in which students apply management principles, technology strategies, market opportunity assessment and validation strategies, financing strategies, in the development of value propositions, business models, and business concepts of a potential new business or organization.

Students will learn how to perceive needs and to propose unique products or services in a business concept that could satisfy those unmet needs. They will also learn about market segmentation and positioning, as well as market research techniques to test their ideas in a real-world context and to identify potential customers, suppliers, and partners. From this, they will learn the definition of a business model and how it can represent the key operational design decisions that an organization makes to properly address a market opportunity in a profitable and distinctive manner.

Through industry examples and case discussions, the participants will learn the nuances of the different types of business models and the opportunities and challenges of refining and evolving business models as more information becomes available. They will then demonstrate this learning through written and oral presentations of their research findings and selected business model.

The course will utilize lectures, case studies, a project assignment, student oral presentations, and guest speakers from industry. This quarter-length course is designed for upper-division undergraduate students.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  1. Develop the knowledge and skills to create your own business.
  2. Acquire knowledge and skillsets in:
    – Idea Generation
    – Opportunity Assessment
    – Risk Identification & Mitigation
    – Market Research / Validation
    – Business model development
    – Business Plan Development (a.k.a. Go to Market Strategy)
    – Business Model Pitch / Presentation

MATERIALS

  • Course Packet [CP]: Harvard Business School Publishing (Required)
  • Textbook [NVC] (Optional)
    • New Venture Creation. 10th Edition, Stephen Spinelli, Jr. and Robert Adams McGraw-Hill, Irwin, New York New York
    • This is a required textbook by the department. However, to reduce the cost of textbook for students, I  decided to make this as optional reading for this year.
    • However, I strongly suggest reading the recommended chapters, if you plan to enroll in MGT 121B – Innovation to Market (B).
    • This book is also available at the library if you decide not to purchase it.
      • This textbook will also be used for MGT 121B – Innovation to Market (B).
      • To purchase the ebook version of this text, go to www.coursesmart.com and in the search box type: 0-07-802910-4
  • Selected PDFs [PDF] – all on Canvas
    • “Achievement predictors for a computer-applications module delivered online.”, Journal of Information Systems Education
    • “Bootcamp Bootleg”, d.school
    • “Business Model Canvas Preview”, Wiley
    • “Pitching Hacks”, Venture Hacks
    • “Testing Business Ideas Preview”, Wiley
  • Course Documents
    • These documents are provided to help you prepare assignments. Students are expected to reference them to help them complete their projects and assignment.
      • Business Idea Generation I Format
      • Business Idea Generation II Format
      • Business Concepts Proposal Format
      • Operations Summary Format
      • Market Research Proposal Format
      • Market Research Results Format
      • Competitive Analysis Format
      • Financial Projection Format
      • Short Business Plan Format
      • Final Presentation Format
      • Business Model Canvas
      • Business Idea Evaluation Sheet
      • Simulation Analysis Format (Foot Truck)
      • Case Study Analysis I Format (IDEO)
      • Case Study Analysis II Format (GolfLogix)
      • Case Study Analysis III Format (Uber)
      • Case Study Analysis IV Format (Room for Desserts)
      • Case Study Analysis V Format (Cipla)
  • Slack Channel
    • We will actively use slack for asynchronous communications outside of the classroom.

CLASSROOM PROCEDURE

The course meets 10 times for 2 hours and 50 minutes each time, with one 10 minutes break. Class sessions will begin and end on time. Please be punctual so that you do not miss the initial thrust of the discussions or disturb others. If you need to miss a class, please email to TA in advance. Keep in mind class participation is part of your grade.

Each student is expected to have completed all readings, assignments for each class before the class starts. Homework will be submitted prior to each class through TritonEd. Each student should be prepared and expected to participate in classroom discussions.

CLASS ASSIGNMENTS

You are expected to read all assignments and prepare answers to the preparation questions prior to class. Each individual is expected to turn in their own assignments unless they are team projects. However, I recommend you work in study groups to discuss the questions prior to completing your own write-up. Come to class prepared to discuss your findings.

Please Note: There are fewer readings and assignments toward the end of the course to allow more time for students to complete their team projects. (front-loaded)

CLASS PARTICIPATION

Every class session will involve interaction in the form of class discussion. I expect each student to be prepared at all times to comment on any class session. To reinforce this expectation, I will randomly cold call on students during the ensuing discussion, both those who raise their hands and those who do not.

Many of the sessions of this class will follow the discussion format. This allows you to apply theories, concepts, and analytical devices discussed in class or in the reading materials, or from other relevant current events or news sources. The direction and quality of the discussion are the collective responsibility of the class, not the sole responsibility of the instructor. Class participation will be graded on your readiness, willingness, and the quality of your comments and their contribution to the discussion.

You are expected to attend every class. You are responsible for the material covered in class whether you attend or not. I realize that despite your best efforts you might miss a class. Please inform TA in advance if you miss a class. If you miss a class you must still submit the homework, in advance of the beginning of class for any planned absences. In the case of emergencies, please contact the TA after class.

Make-up assignments are explained on the syllabus.

I will try to help you with the continuous learning in the COVID-19 pandemic. Let me know if you need a special arrangements. However, please be aware that learning entrepreneurship requires deep interaction with your peers.

GROUP PROJECT

Every student will participate in a group project. The group will be made up of 4-5 students. I will randomly assign every student to a group.

The group assignments will be graded as a group. Each group will be responsible for interim group assignments, as well as a final presentation and short business plan. The formats for these are on Canvas. If your group cannot resolve a problem amongst yourselves, please meet with me.

Final presentations and short business plans are evaluated based on the Business Idea Evaluation Sheet. I strongly recommend that you review the sheet carefully, as you will be expected to address each criterion outlined in this sheet.

GRADING

Class Attendance

  • Submit class contribution after the class (either synchronous or asynchronous) by the deadline (must include the magic word announced in the class).
15 %
Class Contribution

  • Contribution to the in-class discussion (synchronous).
  • Contribution to the online discussion (asynchronous)
15 %
Assignments

  • Submit pre-assignment by the deadline.
20%
Reading Quiz

  • Pass the quiz of self-study materials.
20%
Final Project (Team)

  • Final presentation and deliverables.
30%
Total 100%
  • Please check the scores and let TA know if there is any mistake. It is your responsibility to check the scores. If you did not claim by the end of the quarter, we take it as you agreed with the scores you received.

SCHEDULE

Class 01 (1/4 – Mon): Introduction & Idea Generation
Topics
  • Overall Course Goals and Objectives (Class Participation, Individual Assignments / Group Assignments / Grading)
  • Zoom 201 (Creating an effective learning community based on Zoom environment)
  • What Do We Need to Learn in AI Era?
  • Effectiveness of Online Courses
  • Idea Generation Workshop (Experiencing the idea generation process)
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Read the syllabus carefully
  • Be ready to use Zoom (camera and microphone)
  • Read the following paper briefly to be ready for the discussion.
    • Wallace, Patricia E., and Roy B. Clariana. “Achievement predictors for a computer-applications module delivered online.” Journal of Information Systems Education 11.1 (2020): 3. [PDF]
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch the class video and submit your business idea using bioinspiration.
Recommended Readings
  • Karim R. Lakhani, Vish Krishnan and Ruth Page, ”Bioinspiration at the San Diego Zoo”, Harvard Business School Case, September 2014 (HBS Case #614-703)
Class 02 (1/11 – Mon): Basics of Design Thinking
Topics
  • Basics of design thinking
  • Design thinking workshop on Zoom
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Read “Bootcamp Bootleg”, d.school (PDF) briefly.
  • Prepare blank papers and a pen.
Assignments After Class
  • Study the article and take a quiz on Canvas. (Deadline: Before next class)
    • Clayton M. Christensen et al., “Know Your Customers’ “Jobs to Be Done””, Harvard Business Review, September 2016
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch the class video carefully, read “Bootcamp Bootleg”, and submit a one-page summary of the essence of design thinking you have learned.
Recommended Readings
  • None
Class 03 (1/20 – Wed – Makeup): What is Entrepreneurship? & Business Idea Generation Methods
Topics
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Case Discussion: Movie “October Sky”
  • Business Idea Generation Methods
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Read the following document briefly.
    • Peter F. Drucker, “The Discipline of Innovation”, Harvard Business Review, August 2002
Assignments After Class
  • Study the article and take a quiz on Canvas. (Deadline: Before next class)
    • Peter F. Drucker, “The Discipline of Innovation”, Harvard Business Review, August 2002
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of explaining the characteristics of entrepreneurship.
Recommended Readings
  • Pino G. Audia and Christopher I, Rider, “A Garage and an Idea: What More Does an Entrepreneur Need?”, California Management Review, November 2005
  • [NVC] Chapter 1, pp. 3-17 (“The Global Entrepreneurial Revolution for a Flatter World”)
  • [NVC] Chapter 2, pp. 29-39 (“The Entrepreneurial Mind: Crafting a Personal Entrepreneurial Strategy”)
Class 04 (1/25 – Mon): Prototyping and Experiments & Opportunity Recognition
Topics
  • Prototyping and Experiments
  • Opportunity Recognition
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “01-Business Idea Generation I” (one per individual, see format on Canvas)
  • Play the simulation and submit “02-Simulation Analysis (Food Truck Challenge).” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Simulation: Michael A. Roberto, “New Venture Simulation: The Food Truck Challenge”, HBSP Product #: 7201-HTM-ENG [CP]
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the simulation and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • [NVC] Chapter 3, pp. 77-89 (“The Entrepreneurial Process”)
  • [NVC] Chapter 4, pp. 97-104 (“Lean Commerce and Sustainable Enterprise Movements Are an Opportunity Sea Change”)
Class 5 (2/1 – Mon): Innovation System & Business Model
Topics
  • Innovation System
  • Case Discussion: “IDEO Product Development”
  • Business Model
  • Business Model Canvas
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “03-Business Idea Generation II.” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Read the case and submit “04-Case Study Analysis I (IDEO).”(one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Case: Stefan Thomke, “IDEO Product Development”, Harvard Business School Case, 2007 [CP]
  • Read the following PDF and be ready for the discussion.
    • Business Model Generation Preview, pp. 14-51 [PDF]
Assignments After Class
  • Study the article and take a quiz on Canvas. (Deadline: Before next class)
    • Tim Brown, “Design Thinking”, Harvard Business Review, June 2008
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the case “IDEO” and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • None
Class 6 (2/8 – Mon): Business Model Analysis & Pitch
Topics
  • Business Model Analysis
  • Business Opportunity Assessment / Evaluation Metrics
  • Case Discussion: “GolfLogix: Measuring the Game of Golf”
  • Pitch
  • Guest Speaker I: Mr. John Hayase (Consultant), “Start a Business”
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “05-Business Concepts Proposal.” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Read the case and submit “06-Case Study Analysis II (GolfLogix)” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Case: John T. GourVille and Jerry N. Conover, “GolfLogix: Measuring the Game of Golf”, Harvard Business School Case, Oct 2002 [CP]
  • Read the following PDF, and be ready for the class discussion.
    • “Pitching Hacks”, Venture Hacks [PDF]
Assignments After Class
  • Read the article and take a quiz on Canvas. (Deadline: Before next class)
    • John T. Gourville, “Eager Sellers and Stony Buyers: Understanding the Psychology of New-Product Adoption”, Harvard Business Review, 2006
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the GolfLogix case and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • [NVC] Chap 5, pp. 113-130 (“Opportunity Recognition”)
Class 7 (2/17 – Wed – Makeup):  Platform Business, Market Research, and Experiment
Topics
  • Platform Business
  • Case Discussion: “Uber: Changing the Way the World Moves“
  • Market Research
  • Experiment
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “07-Operations Summary” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Read the case and submit “08-Case Study Analysis III (Uber)” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Case: Youngme Moon, “Uber: Changing the Way the World Moves”, Harvard Business School Case, January 2017 (HBS Case #16011-02) [CP]
  • Skim through the tutorials below.
    • Frank V. Cespedes, “Entrepreneurship Reading: Selling and Marketing in the Entrepreneurial Venture,” Harvard Business School, Core Curriculum Product # 8086-PDF-ENG, Sep 1, 2014 [CP]
    • Thomas R. Eisenmann, Eric Ries, and Sarah Dillard, “Entrepreneurship Reading: Experimenting in the Entrepreneurial Venture,” Harvard Business School, Core Curriculum Product #8077-PDF-ENG, Jul 24, 2014 [CP]
  • Read the following PDF and be ready for the discussion.
    • Testing Business Ideas Preview” [PDF]
Assignments After Class
  • Study the article and take a quiz on Canvas. (Deadline: Before next class)
    • Thomas Eisenmann, Geoffrey Parker, and Marshall W. Van Alstyne, “Strategies for Two-Sided Markets”, Harvard Business Review, October 2006 [CP]
  • Study the tutorials and take a quiz on Canvas.(Deadline: Before next class)
    • Frank V. Cespedes, “Entrepreneurship Reading: Selling and Marketing in the Entrepreneurial Venture,” Harvard Business School, Core Curriculum Product # 8086-PDF-ENG, Sep 1, 2014 [CP]
    • Thomas R. Eisenmann, Eric Ries, and Sarah Dillard, “Entrepreneurship Reading: Experimenting in the Entrepreneurial Venture,” Harvard Business School, Core Curriculum Product #8077-PDF-ENG, Jul 24, 2014 [CP]
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the Uber case and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • None
Class 8 (2/22 – Mon): Business Plan, and Competitive Analysis
Topics
  • Business Plan
  • Case Study “Business Plan for Room For Dessert”
  • Competitive Analysis
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “09-Market Research Proposal” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Read the case and submit “10-Case Study Analysis IV (Room for Desserts)” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Joseph B. Lassiter III and Michael J. Roberts, “Business Plan for Room For Dessert: Adding Unique Ingredients to life’s balancing act”, Harvard Business School Case, 2005 [CP]
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the “Room for Desserts” case and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • Richard G. Hamermesh, Paul W. Marshall, Taz Pirmohamed, “Note on Business Model Analysis for the Entrepreneur”, Harvard Business Review, January 2002
  • [NVC] Chap 7, pp. 163-166 (“The Business Plan”)
Class 9 (3/1 – Mon): Entrepreneurial Ethics and Financial Projection
Topics
  • Ethics
  • Inclusive Innovation
  • Case Discussion: “Cipla”
  • Financial Projection
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “11-Competitive Analysis” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Submit “12-Market Research Results Draft” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Read the case and submit “13-Case Study Analysis V (Cipla)” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
    • Rohit Deshpande and Laura Winig, “Cipla”, Harvard Business School Case, June 2003 (HBS Case #503085-PDF-ENGCiPLA) [CP]
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the “Cipla” case and its discussion.
Recommended Readings
  • [NVC[ Chap 6, pp. 143-152 (“Opportunities for Social Entrepreneurship”)
  • [NVC] Chap 9, pp. 229-238 (“Ethical Decision Making and the Entrepreneur”)
Class 10 (3/9 – Mon) – Team Resources, and San Diego Ecosystem
Topics
  • The Entrepreneurial Leader and the Team
  • Resource Requirement
  • Guest Speaker II: Mr. Nathan Owerns: “San Diego Ecosystem”
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “14-Market Research Results” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Submit “15-Financial Projection” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
Make-up Assignment
  • Watch class-video carefully. Submit a one-page summary of the main learnings from the “San Diego Ecosystem” lecture.
Recommended Readings
  • [NVC] Chap 8, pp. 195-204 (“The Entrepreneurial Leader and the Team”)
  • [NVC] Chap 10, pp. 247-255 (“Resource Requirements”)
Final Exam (3/17 – Wed – 7-10 pm) – Final Presentation & Wrap-up
Topics
  • Final Presentation (Joint session with Waseda Business School)
  • Guest Evaluators: Mr.Tetsuhiro Shimodaira, Mr. Charles Chen Fang, Mr. Alex Jen
  • Wrap Up
Preparation Assignments Before Class
  • Submit “Short Business Plan” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
  • Submit “Presentation” (one per group, see format on Canvas)
Make-up Assignment
  • Must be present in the session
Recommended Readings
  • None

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The integrity of scholarship is essential for an academic community. As members of the Rady School, we pledge ourselves to uphold the highest ethical standards. The University expects that both faculty and students will honor this principle and in so doing protect the validity of University intellectual work. For students, this means that all academic work will be done by the individual to whom it is assigned, without unauthorized aid of any kind.

The complete UCSD Policy on Integrity of Scholarship can be viewed at:
https://senate.ucsd.edu/Operating-Procedures/Senate-Manual/appendices/2

How the Honor Code applies to this course:

  • You can work with anyone on class assignments. I suggest that you work in study groups on homework assignments.
  • Your class preparation and assignments must not benefit from class materials by students who took this course in prior years, or at other schools. Using course notes or PowerPoint slides you received from previous students of this class is a violation of the UCSD Honor Code.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

A student who has a disability or special need and requires an accommodation in order to have equal access to the classroom must register with the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD). The OSD will determine what accommodations may be made and provide the necessary documentation to present to the faculty member.

The student must present the OSD letter of certification and OSD accommodation recommendation to the appropriate faculty member in order to initiate the request for accommodation in classes, examinations, or other academic program activities. No accommodations can be implemented retroactively.

Please visit the OSD website for further information or contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at (858) 534-4382 or osd@ucsd.edu.

EQUITY, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION

A knowledge of diversity, equity, and inclusion is required of students in this class.

Definition of Terms:

Diversity refers to the variety of personal experiences, values, and world-views that arise from differences of culture and circumstance. Such differences include race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, language, abilities/disabilities, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and geographic region.

Equity is the guarantee of fair treatment, access, opportunity, and advancement for all students, faculty, and staff…while at the same time striving to identify and eliminate barriers that have prevented the full participation of marginalized groups.

Inclusion is the act of creating environments in which any individual or group can feel welcomed, respected, supported, and valued.